Our First Feature, Bret Rieff

September 29, 2014  •  3 Comments

A few weeks ago, we shared that Brandy and I would begin featuring one person in need of a kidney each week. More specifically, we shared that the features would begin after Raleigh received his transplant. The messages we've received have been so touching and special. We hope we can provide a way to bring attentioA few weeks ago, we shared that we would begin featuring one person in need of a kidney each week. More specifically, we shared that the features would begin after Raleigh received his transplant. The messages we've received have been so touching and special. We hope we can provide a way to bring attention to your need, and hopefully others will feel the same urge to help you as they did to help Raleigh.


If you are, or know someone who is, in need of a kidney transplant, please message us at [email protected]
 

Now for our very first feature: A Kidney for Bret Reiff  "My name is Bret Reiff, and I was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in 1994. I have been able to avoid dialysis by taking medications as prescribed, following a very restricted diet and remaining under the constant care of my nephrologist. Those choices have served me well until recently. I now find myself on the brink of dialysis and desperate for a kidney transplant. I was approved for transplant and placed on the waiting list in May of this year. Members of my wife’s family have been tested but were not a match or were excluded for health reasons. No member of my family is able to donate because each of them has PKD. Living with PKD is not easy, but I’ve managed as best as I could. I try to work as if I don’t have this horrible condition, but I fatigue very easily. Just as my work has been affected, so has my personal life. My wife of nearly 20 years, Sandy, and I enjoy being active and doing things together. Unfortunately, my ability to do any activity that requires energy is cut short by exhaustion, swollen ankles or pain. My life literally revolves around this disease. I miss being able to stay up late with friends around the campfire and waking up early enough to watch the sunrise. PKD is also the primary reason that Sandy and I made the difficult decision to not have children. I just can’t stand the thought of someone else, my own child especially, having to suffer with this dreaded disease. To fill the void of not having children and do our part to help others, we sponsor Salvation Army Angels (children in need) each year. We never know the individual children we sponsor, but we feel good knowing that we can make a difference in a child’s life. We are also active members in our church and community. I would do anything to get my energetic, healthy life back. I do not want to miss out on any chance to make more memories with Sandy. I want to be able to lift more than 20 pounds and be the active man I was before PKD took over my life. The only way I can ever be who I once was is by receiving a kidney transplant. I have always found it easy to help others when I can, but it is not easy for me to ask for help. I have now reached a point that I know there is no other option than to ask for help from any and every one I can. My blood type is B+, and I can receive a kidney from those who are B +, B -, O + and O - . Please, if you feel the desire or need to help and be tested as a donor match for me, contact Emory at 855-366-7989. Let them know you would like to be tested as a living donor match for Marvin Bret Reiff (DOB 9/10/58). Thank you for even taking the time to read my story. I hope and pray it touches the heart of someone who would be willing to give me such a special gift – the gift of life."

 


Comments

kelly(non-registered)
Many, if not all, of the most common anti rejection drugs can cause secondary cancers, usually PTLD, or skin cancers, i.e. cellcept, prograf
KimC(non-registered)
@hill.... Hello, my name is Kimberly. I am very sorry to hear about your husband. I am also struggling with PKD. I am in Stage 5, on transplant list, but not on dialysis yet. If you don't mind, can you tell name of the anti rejecting drug that contributed to your husband's cancer? I would like to do some research on it. Thank you and be blessed.
hill(non-registered)
I know what your going through. My husband had PKD and had a transplant at Emory over 25 years ago. He was lucky, his sister was a match. He has been deceased since 2006 from cancer. One of the side effects of drugs he had to take to keep from rejecting his kidney. My daughter has been told she also has PKD, so far shes had no kidney problems. She's just turned 40. We didn't know my husband had PKD until he was in his 50's. He had joined a study group at Emory, MDRD that was trying to find a way to understand PKD. The study concluded that nothing could help.
Good luck to you.
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